This Child, Every Child

Snapshot_20110301_1There is an eye-opening book by David J. Smith and illustrator Shelagh Armstrong for children aged 9 to 12 called If the World Were a Village.

It was highlighted in a workshop for inquiry-based teaching that I attended called “Making the PYP Happen” (the elementary track of the IB program).

In February, Daid J. Smith and Shelagh Armstrong had another book published that offers a statistical glimpse into the lives of children around the world.

This Child, Every Child: A Book about the World’s Children has both statistics and stories to give readers a realistic perspective of the world, and to show a window into the lives of children in faraway places.

This Child, Every Child: A Book about the World’s Children shows the striking disparities in the way children live. Some children lack opportunities that others take for granted.

This Child, Every Child: A Book about the World’s Children has heavy topics, contrasting children’s lives against the rights they are guaranteed under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Every second of every day, four more children are added to the world’s population of over 2.2 billion children. Some of these 2.2 billion children will be cared for and have enough to eat and a place to call home. Many others will not be so fortunate.

Because of topics like children in war and the complexity of the text, I do not recommend this book for young readers (who are not the intended audience). However, This Child, Every Child: A Book about the World’s Children

is a fantastic, thought-provoking book for anyone aged 9 and older.

Group discussions, reflection, and journaling or essay response would be an inspired follow-up activity for an in-class reading of This Child, Every Child: A Book about the World’s Children.

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